Tropoja

TROPOJE – BAJRAM CURRI

GENERAL INFORMATION

The administrative center of the district of Tropoja, Bajram Curri was built under the communism and has been named after one of the main figures of liberation of Albania from the Ottoman Rule. Bajram Curri was in fact from Kosovo, a fact that brought him into a conflict with Ahmet Zogu (later known as King Zog), for whom a reunification with Kosova was not a priority. After more than twenty years in and out of the leadership of Albania, he died in a cave near Dragobia in the year 1925, it was said that he was assassinated under Zog’s orders. A large Socialist Realist statue of him looks down over the main square of the town that has been named after him. The museum that is located behind the large statue was looted in the year 1997 and since then has remained closed.

How to get to Tropoje – Bajram Curri

Minibuses/furgons leave Gjakova and Prizren in Kosovo for Bajram Curri in the morning (€2,50 from Gjakova). Like the rest of Albania their schedules depend on the demand.
Minibuses from Shkodra use the scenic ferry across Lake Koman (400 lek). They leave Shkodra at about 06.00 – 07.00 and Tirana at about 05.00.

Two ferries depart Koman for Fierze (near Bajram Curri) in summer (June to September) at about 0900 and 1000, with only one ferry in winter. The ferry costs 400 lek per passenger.
From Tirana, minibuses using the ferry leave at about 05.00. Other minibuses go by the new highway which goes through Gjakova.
From the drop-off point for the ferry from Koman, take a minibus or join a private car to Bajram Curri for about 200 lek, if you are not using the minibus that goes on the car ferry.

ACCOMMODATION IN TROPOJE OF ALBANIA

 

 

ACTIVITIES IN TROPOJE OF ALBANIA

 

 

TROPOJE – BAJRAM CURRI

GENERAL INFORMATION

The administrative center of the district of Tropoja, Bajram Curri was built under the communism and has been named after one of the main figures of liberation of Albania from the Ottoman Rule. Bajram Curri was in fact from Kosovo, a fact that brought him into a conflict with Ahmet Zogu (later known as King Zog), for whom a reunification with Kosova was not a priority. After more than twenty years in and out of the leadership of Albania, he died in a cave near Dragobia in the year 1925, it was said that he was assassinated under Zog’s orders. A large Socialist Realist statue of him looks down over the main square of the town that has been named after him. The museum that is located behind the large statue was looted in the year 1997 and since then has remained closed.

How to get to Tropoje – Bajram Curri

Minibuses/furgons leave Gjakova and Prizren in Kosovo for Bajram Curri in the morning (€2,50 from Gjakova). Like the rest of Albania their schedules depend on the demand.
Minibuses from Shkodra use the scenic ferry across Lake Koman (400 lek). They leave Shkodra at about 06.00 – 07.00 and Tirana at about 05.00.

Two ferries depart Koman for Fierze (near Bajram Curri) in summer (June to September) at about 0900 and 1000, with only one ferry in winter. The ferry costs 400 lek per passenger.
From Tirana, minibuses using the ferry leave at about 05.00. Other minibuses go by the new highway which goes through Gjakova.
From the drop-off point for the ferry from Koman, take a minibus or join a private car to Bajram Curri for about 200 lek, if you are not using the minibus that goes on the car ferry.

ACCOMMODATION IN TROPOJE – BAJRAM CURRI

SIGHTSEEING IN TROPOJE – BAJRAM CURRI

Statuja e Bajram Curri (Statue of Bajram Curri): This larger than life statue stands tall in front of the History Museum in Bajram Curri. Bajram Curri is constructed wearing a traditional Northern Albanian cap, holding a large shot gun and holding his hand out in front of the center of town in Bajram Curri, as to say “I will forever protect you.”

The Bajram Curri History Museum:  The Bajram Curri History Museum has been recently renovated, restored and renewed. The museum has won a grant that funded the renovation, provided new artifacts and a new staff. Bajram Curri is famous for this museum and is definitely worth stopping by and exploring the history of the region.

The Bajram Curri Water Mill: The Bajram Curri Water Mill is located on the Valbona River about a 30 minute walk north of Bajram Curri. This water mill was built in order to force water from one stream into the Valbona River in order to produce more water for the town of Bajram Curri. This water mill is truly historical and an inside look to the water infrastructure of Bajram Curri.

Xhamia e Qytetit, (Down the road from the main square, visible from most of the town). This mosque is in a state of disrepair and disuse. Nevertheless it is worth seeing from the outside, set against the Albanian Alps in the background.

Kulla e Mic Sokolit (Mic Sokoli Tower), (southwest of Bajraam Curri in Bujan village):  The Mic Sokoli Museum is located in the village of Bujan, about a 20 minute walk outside the city limits of Bajram Curri. This small, informative museum is located in the tower where Miç Sokoli took refuge and houses artifacts that were actually used by Miç Sokoli during his time.

The Statue of the Unknown Solider: The Statue of the Unknown Solider is located in the National War Hero Graveyard and is located 20 minutes outside of Bajram Curri. The statue stands tall in the middle of the graveyard representing all of the unknown soldiers that died to gain Albania’s independence.

The National War Hero Graveyard: The National War Hero Graveyard is located outside of Bajram Curri and holds the statue of the Unknown Solider. This is the same location that holds the ‘May 5’ celebration where locals honor soliders that fought for Albania’s freedom.

Visit the Valbona valley which includes the Valbona River. The village of Valbona is less than an hour away by taxi and can be enjoyed in a day. Hiking and mountain-climbing options abound for the more adventurous in the Valbona Valley Mountain Range. There are traditional restaurants along the roads to Valbona that serve traditional Albanian food.

Visit the Shoshani Canyon outside Bajram Curri.

 

 


 

THE HISTORY OF TROPOJE – BAJRAM CURRI

Bajram Curri (1862 – 1925) was a local war hero, politician and activist during the Ottoman Empire and was awarded the title of ‘Hero of Albania’ due to his heroic service to Albania. Born in Gjakova, Bajram Curri represented the interests of the Albanians and fought against the Young Turks. He was a member of the committee for the National Defense of Kosovo and held various government positions as Minister and commander in the army. Bajram Curri was killed in 1925 in the small village of Dragobi when he was cornered in one of his places of refuge. The cave of Bajram Curri’s death can still be visited today in Dragobi, a small isolated village between the city of Bajram Curri and Valbona.

In honor of his role as a freedom fighter, the biggest city in the Tropoje Region was renamed after his death in 1925. During communist times Bajram Curri had an infamous past with ‘civil feuds.’ These civil feuds, as they were known to the rest of the world, were product of the Code of Leke Dukagjin, a set of traditional laws passed down from generation to generation unmodified. The first written version of this code of ethics wasn’t printed until 1933, 18 years after Bajram Curri died, and was there after referred to as the Kanun. While most of Albania was sealed off from the rest of the world until 1991, the region of Tropoje was closed off even longer do to the civil feuds and poor road conditions. Click here for more information on the Kanun and what that meant for Northern Albania.

Bajram Curri currently has about 8,000 citizens, most of which are Muslim. The Tropoje region is home to Sali Berisha, the current Prime Minister of Albania. This part of the region is typically affiliated with the Democratic party of Albania.

Now, Bajram Curri is full of welcoming locals, the most historical tourist attractions in the Kukes Region and is easily accessible from the capital city due to the new highway that was constructed a few years ago. Since the town of Bajram Curri has recently been manageable to travelers, most of the Kukes Region has hardly changed in the past 50 years do to the inaccessibility. Bajram Curri can be accessed through public minibuses from Tirane, Krume or from the Fierze after the beautiful ferry ride.

 


 

USEFUL INFORMATION ABOUT TROPOJE – BAJRAM CURRI

UNIQUE CULTURE OF ALBANIA

The Albanian culture is an exotic blend of traditions that have evolved over thousands of years. From the ancient Illyrians and Greeks to the Romans and the Ottomans, the language, music, arts, and cuisine of the Albanian people are a rich and vibrant mix of many civilizations. Once you discover our culture, you are bound to fall in love with this new destination on the Mediterranean.

Hospitality is in our nature. Welcoming guests and ensuring their comfort is a hallmark of Albanian heritage and is epitomized by our very own Nobel Peace Prize recipient: Mother Teresa. The spirit of cooperation and friendship thrives in Albania, and it is not uncommon for guests to be invited to eat and drink with curious locals wishing to learn more about you.

Besa is a concept related to the Albanian code of honor and is an idea that is very important to the Albanian people. In the Kanun (a set of traditional Albanian laws), Besa is described as the highest authority, so essential to personal and familial standing as to be virtually a cult. Besa has been the subject of some stories and novels by Albania’s foremost modern novelist, Ismail Kadare, a Nobel Prize Candidate for Literature and winner of several international prizes. Kadare’s work has been published in over forty countries and translated into more than thirty languages, making Kadare the best ambassador of Albanian literature worldwide.

If we are speaking about the food and drinks of Albania, then we must mention the country’s deliciously-unique cuisine. It has many similarities to Turkish and Greek dishes, but offers a healthier, Mediterranean twist. Come try our wide variety of phyllo dough delicacies, including a melt-in-your-mouth sensation called byrek, or the original sweet treat known regionally as baklava.

Albania also has a long tradition of wine craftsmanship, which is lately being revived to its former glory. While you’re here, taste a sampling of our wine, produced from a rich soil that has been under cultivation since the ancient Greeks and Romans. Regardless of your culinary inclinations, we guarantee that our rich history and culinary traditions have created a menu of mouth-watering specialties for you to try.

Each region of Albania likes to specialize in its own brand of music, thus giving the music aficionado an incentive to explore the entire country in search of each community’s sense of style. For example, UNESCO has classified a type of music from southern Albania, known as Iso Polyphony, to have tremendous cultural value to humankind. Our music has even given rise to a few prominent artists of global acclaim, including opera lyric soprano, Inva Mula, and the distinguished violinist, Tedi Papavrami.

In regards to style, when you arrive in Albania, you will notice that the men take great pride in their appearance and will often don a suit and tie when in public. Even if their errands only involve a short trip to the grocery store, the men will dress to impress.

Depending upon the type of festival or time of year, you might even catch a glimpse of Albanian men in traditional folk attire. The National Folk Festival held in Gjirokastra is a prime example. This special autumn event is held once every four years and attracts artists from around the world.

The women of Albania also share a flair for style, especially at traditional Albanian weddings. At these events, the families of both the bride and groom will gather together in their finest dress and celebrate with great fervor. Weddings are often the ideal opportunity to witness the best of Albanian culture all in one event, and if you’re invited to one, the experience will undoubtedly be extraordinary.

Albanian culture is unique in many ways and we hope you’ll visit us to see it firsthand. We say ‘yes’ by shaking our head from side to side, both men and women greet each other with a kiss on either cheek, and our conversations are loud and passionate in an effort to entice others to join in. Visit Albania and discover why our culture is a new Mediterranean love.

MAP OF ALBANIA

map of Albania

map of Albania

PHOTO GALLERY OF TROPOJA

MAP OF TROPOJA